Black & White Movies

Discussion in 'Television & Movies' started by PongQ, Apr 28, 2017.

  1. PongQ

    PongQ Well-Known Forum Member

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    Kinky!
     
  2. PongQ

    PongQ Well-Known Forum Member

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    I think all silent films are a struggle for people raised on color/sound movies. I know it is for me.
     
  3. Dstraktd

    Dstraktd Adminstigator Staff Member

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    The real reason...
     
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  4. PongQ

    PongQ Well-Known Forum Member

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    Damn! You got me pegged. (Insert off color pegging joke below)
     
  5. Dstraktd

    Dstraktd Adminstigator Staff Member

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    That sounds like your Saturday night at MY mom's house.
     
  6. Donald Draper

    Donald Draper Well-Known Forum Member

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    Thoughts on a few more, as the quest continues...

    The General - This is a watchable silent movie. By that, I mean silent movies are a chore for me. This one is much less so. Buster's acrobatics steal the show (Jackie Chan's physicality is similar to some of Buster's stunts). The plot is entertaining and straightforward. If you've never watched a silent film, it's not a bad place to start.

    Arsenic and Old Lace - Just a great movie. Don't want to comment too much, as it would spoil it for those that haven't seen it. Definitely belongs on a must see list. Watch it or I'll have Teddy dig another lock for you in the Panama Canal.

    Duck Soup - Now I understand Ceezyr's Rufus T. Firefly glasses (and the great description - one of the better quotes from the movie). I had to google duck soup after watching. Apparently in 1933 it was slang for something easy. That fits with the movie, which really has nothing to do with ducks or soup.

    It's funny to watch older movies after seeing more recent work that was clearly influenced by them. When I was watching Duck Soup it brought to mind Rodney Dangerfield, Mel Brooks, and a splash of Airplane/Naked Gun/Coming to America. If you like any of these, you'll find something to like in Duck Soup.
     
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  7. Donald Draper

    Donald Draper Well-Known Forum Member

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    Just finished Modern Times. Much like with Laura, it's amazing how some of the big themes never change. Instead of Hollywood (as in Laura), Modern Times addresses the plight of the working man in an era of increased automation.

    The thing about these movies is I've got to plan on spending a few hours reading about them after watching. Here are a few tidbits that aren't spoilers that would have made the movie even more interesting while watching.

    First, it came out about 10 years after talkies became common. But Chaplin kept it (largely) silent. He was afraid that putting voice to his character The Tramp would shrink his worldwide audience. He thought the pantomime was superior and that talkies were going to be a flash in the pan. As with his other movies, he wrote, directed, financed, and composed the music.

    He also was married to the female lead (he's late 40s, she's mid 20s....way to go Chuck). And once again, I'm disturbed finding a woman who's been dead nearly 30 years to be hot. But she is, no doubt about it.
     
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  8. WonderWoman

    WonderWoman Forum Member

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    OMG I LOVE THAT LINE!!!
     
  9. Donald Draper

    Donald Draper Well-Known Forum Member

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    I just finished both versions of The Man Who Knew Too Much. The first is great because it's Peter Lorre's big break, as well as the film that really put Hitchcock on the map. That said, it's still got some issues. Notably, the plot really isn't developed at all.

    Hitchcock remade the move 22 years later, starring Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day. The second version is better in nearly every way. As Hitchcock put it, the first was the work of an amateur and the second that of a professional.

    I'd recommend skipping the first version and watching the second. But if you're not familiar with Peter Lorre (and you should be, he's in tons of great movies) you should at least watch this clip. It's from the Maltese Falcon, and he's on the receiving end of one of the best tough guy slaps ever.




    I know you're wondering...he said "one of the best tough guy slaps," what else is out there? This one for starters:

     
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  10. PongQ

    PongQ Well-Known Forum Member

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    C'mon Don. Those are wussy slaps:

     
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